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Archive for June 2012

Editorial cartoon: Happy Birthday America!

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Eagle and Flag 6-29-12

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Written by shiretown99

June 29, 2012 at 2:30 am

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Animal Care & Adoption Center holds grand opening

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On Saturday, June 23 hundreds of visitors attended the grand opening of the revamped Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center of the Animal Rescue League of Boston. Numerous staff members and volunteers provided guided tours of the site, highligting improvements in design that will improve the health of the creatures housed there as well as the environmental sustainability of the property.
 
Shown here, left to right at the ribbon-cutting ceremony are: Lisa Lagos, Manager of the Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center; Malcolm McDonald, Chairman of the Board of ARL-Boston; and Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, Director of Veterinary Medical Services and Interim President of ARL-Boston.

 


 
Photo by Scott Heald

 

Under a sunny sky on Saturday afternoon, June 23, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center held a grand opening celebration to mark the completion of improved designs that will make the animals it serves healthier and contribute to sustainable development locally.
 
The event included guided tours of the revamped building by staff members and volunteers; a reading and book distribution session of the book “Toto the Tornado Kitten” about an animal in Western Massachusetts affected by last year’s tornadoes; and strolls through the entire campus, including the barn and pasture.
 
Malcolm McDonald, Chairman of the Board of Directors for ARL-Boston, discussed the importance of the refurbished shelter. “We’re thrilled with the facility,” he said. “It’s wonderful to have so many people come out.” In addition to the site in this town, ARL-Boston administers animal shelters in Boston and Brewster.
 
Lucy Schlaffer, a partner with ARQ Architects, highlighted the benefits the new building would confer both on the animals residing there and on the humans who work there. Although the structure’s footprint of 4,850 square feet did not change, its use of that area was altered considerably. Those new elements include enhanced ventilation featuring 100 percent outside air circulating through the building, substantially lowering the rate of animal sickness; improved space for the adoption of pets; solar thermal collectors on the roof to heat water; and permeable pavement in the parking area so that rainfall may pass more easily into the groundwater without needing purification. “This can be a model for other communities to follow,” she said. “The health of the animals is really the driver.”
 
Beth Finn, Assistant Manager of the Dedham facility, pointed out additional features that incorporate best practices within the industry. Those include a separate space for small animals such as guinea pigs, rabbits and birds; sliding glass doors to many rooms reducing the noise and stress levels experienced by the animals; a “kitty condo” area for kittens featuring a skylight and built-in perches; a cistern in which recycled water is collected, filtered, pumped, chlorined and dyed blue, then used as non-potable cleaning water; an examination area for dogs including a grooming tub and granite floor with regulated temperature; a washroom with an animal toilet and toys; an outside yard, where doggie playgroup can take place; new kennels that allow dogs to go inside and outside on their own; sniff holes for feeding animals treats; a new sanitizing machine for food bowls and litter boxes; a surgical room; the ability to spay and neuter animals; and a quarantine area to guard against the spread of disease.
 
In addition, the staff has improved facilities such as lockers, a break room and shower. The latter becomes necessary when a staff member returns to the campus after attending to a sick or dirty animal in the wild or at a house. There is also more office space for supervisors and a multi-purpose room donated by Petco Foundation that will serve as space for dog training for the public, training for volunteers and staff, and evaluations of dogs.
 
The refurbished central facility forms the key element of the entire campus, which includes a barn, pet cemetery, garage, a house for the Dedham campus manager, a house for the cemetery caretaker, as well as a crematorium.
 
 
[Excluding holidays, the Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center is open to the public from Tuesday to Friday each week from 1 to 6:30 p.m., and on weekends from noon to 5:30 p.m. For further information, please visit www.arlboston.org.] 

 

Written by shiretown99

June 29, 2012 at 2:25 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Photo: Veteran addresses another Veteran about rabbit

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Walter Kaeding, standing at center-right, speaks to fellow Dedhamite and Veteran Mike Glowacki, at podium at left, during Monday night’s Parks and Rec meeting.
 
Photo by Scott Heald

Written by shiretown99

June 21, 2012 at 11:49 pm

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Parks and Rec meeting summary: Rabbit discussion

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Vehement Viewpoints Expressed Concerning Rabbit Sculpture in Oakdale Square
 
Supporters describe public art as “catalyst for discussion”; opponents perceive space dedicated to Veterans as “sacred ground”
 
 
Residents packed the Lower Conference Room of Town Hall on Monday evening for a Parks and Recreation Commission meeting to hear arguments concerning the rabbit sculpture recently placed on the lawn of Veterans Park at Oakdale Common, and both sides featured impassioned proponents who sometimes invoked the memory of the man for whom the rabbit was dedicated. After listening to the various speakers the board did not reach any decision on the matter.
 
Chairman Dan Hart opened the proceedings by outlining rules for the night. He emphasized that since the session was Parks and Rec’s monthly meeting rather than specifically a public discussion, no more than three speakers representing each sides of the issue would be allowed to make a presentation. He explained the process by which Parks and Rec approved the request by Dedham Public Art Project to put the sculpture at Oakdale Common.
 
“The Commissioners granted approval for the placement of the artwork with only three conditions: It is temporary, Mrs. Kehoe as a representative of the Monument Committee be notified, and that final placement be approved by Bob Stanley as not to damage any sprinkler heads within the common,” he said. “Those conditions were met. With that being said, going forward all communications in regards to any park property concerning Veterans will be through and with the Veterans Agent. He will be responsible for disseminating the information going forward.” Hart added that no one should speak on behalf of anyone not present, and that any discussion about the prospective use of Oakdale Common, beyond the current issue, would take place at a future meeting.  
 
Then Norfolk County Commissioner Fran O’Brien spoke of the need to allow all in attendance who wished to express themselves to speak at the meeting. “I disagree with having three representatives. We as Veterans of the armed forces of the Unites States of America, representing the town of Dedham, we have several here this evening that would like to make comments,” he said. “Your board should at least take into consideration the wishes of the public that came out here tonight, pro or con. Give them a right to say what they want. We’re not in a rush to get this matter over with.” He noted that as a former chairman of the Board of Selectmen and the current chairman of the Norfolk County Commissioners, he never barred any citizen from speaking who attended a meeting.
 
But Hart was unmoved. “I think that each of those three (representatives per perspective) can make the case clearly, and that if we continue comment we’re just going to hear the same information from a different person.”
 
Next Monika Wilkinson, Co-president of the non-profit Dedham Shines which is closely involved with the Dedham Public Art Project, spoke. She outlined the rationale for placing rabbit artwork around town for the next few months, and the specific process by which approval to put a sculpture on Oakdale Common had been obtained.
 
“The temporary placement of the sculpture in Oakdale Common followed months of planning and preparation. A generous donation was made in the memory of a beloved neighbor and friend, Joe Pagliuca, with the hope that the sculpture would be placed in Oakdale Square. Joe was a lifelong Dedham resident, and a proud World War II Army Veteran.” She emphasized that members of the Veterans Monument Committee had been consulted before a formal presentation was made to Parks & Rec seeking that board’s approval. “All (who took part in planning) expected that the sculpture would bring new visitors to the park to appreciate the monument, which we can say with full confidence, it has.” She added, “Public art has often served as a catalyst for discussion,” and cited the Statue of Liberty as an example of a work of art that generated criticism when it was being constructed.
 
The ensuing speaker was Commissioner O’Brien. He admonished the Parks & Rec commissioners for failing to consult the Combined Veterans Council and the Veterans Agent. “When it was dedicated it was dedicated as a park, not a portion thereof. The entire triangle was dedicated as a park. I’m sure if you read the monument, it says that. I am here tonight to represent all of the Veterans, of every war.” He continued, “I’m here tonight to say there were plenty of places to put this. I was never notified, and I was a member of that committee. I raised $10,000 or more. I am here tonight to tell you that that is not the place. The place it should have been is Oakdale School. You talk about Joe Pagliuca, he was my dear friend. He graduated from Dedham High School, 1933. A great football player – he played on the same team as my brother Jack, former Fire Chief here in the Town of Dedham. Joe Pagliuca is calling me from heaven, and he’s telling me, ‘This is absolutely nonsense.'”
 
At that point Hart interrupted. “We can’t speak for someone not here,” he said. “I have instructed clearly.” O’Brien responded, “I am speaking for every Veteran: Jim Bradbury, Ray Menice, Red Glennon – the top football (player), every kid in this town. I think I can mention the names, and I’m within the Open Meeting Law. I don’t think I should be told what I can say or not say. But I am here to say to this board tonight that there is a compromise on the table – that that bunny goes by September, and if it doesn’t go then there will be further action taken.”
 
O’Brien then introduced Michael Cassidy, National Executive Committeeman of the American Legion, Department of Massachusetts. “The unfortunate part about the situation you have here in Dedham is it’s happening all over the nation. Parks, monuments dedicated to the Veteran community are being now used for other purposes, purposes which they were not designed for. The monument and park are specifically dedicated to the Veterans of Dedham, those who have served in every war and conflict. It is sacred ground. It should be held in the highest esteem. The men and women from Dedham it represents should always be remembered,” he said. “When you in Dedham dedicated that memorial to the Veterans of this community, and the land surrounding it, you accepted a responsibility to ensure that the town of Dedham, and those visiting Dedham, realize the significance of the sacrifices and the commitment those men and women made.” He said he admired freedom of speech, but suggested the opinion of the majority had been violated. “You have desecrated the land for which that was dedicated.”

Mike Glowacki, one of the two artists who worked on the sculpture, spoke next. “I’m a Veteran of the Army and the Marine Corps. I was a grunt in the Army after high school. In `99 I joined the Marine Corps. I fought in Baghdad, I fought in Mogadishu. We’ve almost ruined this memorial for Joe,” he said. “This man’s dead and a Vet and he needs to be honored. That’s why I made it, that’s why I signed up to make it. I’m proud of my work. If anybody thinks that I did something dishonorable or disgraceful to a war memorial, which I know firsthand about, I’d like for them to tell me right now that that’s what I did.”
 
At that point Walter Kaeding, himself a Veteran and an officer in the American Legion Post 18, stood up. “I would say you’re not disgraceful to our country. I would say you did a great job,” he said. “You’ve got a lot to be proud of, stick your chest out.”
 
Glowacki continued. “We knew that this was for Joe, we knew this when we made it. We did the best job that we could. If I thought there was going to be any type of problem, or if I thought there was something wrong with this as a Veteran, I would never have done that. I don’t believe that’s the case at all, I never have and I’m never going to. I want this man to have his remembrance.”
 
The following speaker was Dana McQuaid of Lindale Avenue in Riverdale, commander of the USS Jacob Jones VFW Post 2017 and committee chairman of the town’s Combined Veterans Council. “It’s really, really funny that in this world of instant messaging, email, Twitter, Facebook, and oh let’s not forget, the home phone number, that nobody was notified. The Memorial Committee that was put together for that memorial has not met in ten years. Ten years. Marie Rizzo, were you notified? She was on the committee, nobody said anything to her. Fran O’Brien was on that committee. Nobody said anything to him. There were ten members, I’m only giving you two. Nobody said anything to them. A committee that doesn’t meet in ten years does not represent the Veterans in the town of Dedham nowadays. Those Veterans are all in Brookdale (Cemetery).” He concluded by suggesting the rabbit could remain where it is. “Can the statue stay there? Sure, just get it out before Veterans Day. Is it appropriate? No.” He asked the Parks & Rec commissioners, Mrs. Kehoe and Dedham Shines to apologize to the Veterans for not notifying them of the plan for the sculpture.
 
Next to speak was Marie-Louise Kehoe, who was among the members of the original Monument Committee. “To begin with, I’d like to get it straight: It’s not a Veterans memorial, it’s a tribute to the Veterans,” she said. “To those Veterans who have served, are presently serving, and will serve in the future.” She added that her husband was a proud Veteran.

 
Then she described the work of the committee that made the monument a reality. “We raised $250,000. Frankly, I raised a good part of that myself. We had a great committee. Everyone got along, everyone agreed. We bought the very best granite we could buy. We did everything so it would be a tribute to the Veterans. I cannot tell you how much respect I have for the Veterans, and I’ve been accused of having no respect. This has been very hurtful for me.” She added that she was initially hesitant about placing the rabbit in the park, but then she met with Dedham Shines and Mike Glowacki. She added, “Joe Pagliuca was a friend of mine for many years, and I thought: ‘What a great combination. It’s all coming together: Joe, the Veteran who worked on the beautiful bunny, and the Veterans monument. What could be better?'” She added that she insisted that the bunny could not be situated near the monument.  “Shame on us if we made a mistake, but I don’t believe we made a mistake. I believe that we did what was right.” She concluded by urging a solution that would show honor to the Veterans.
 
Then Hart turned to his colleagues on the board to seek comment. After Jim Maher and Sal Ledda said they had no comments, Chuck DelloIacono spoke briefly. “It’s a horrible position we’re in. We thought we were doing the right job by moving forward” he said. “The line of communications faltered somewhere. It puts us in a really bad situation. Anybody that knows me knows how dear to my heart, how I’m very close to the Veterans in this community, every one of them,” he said. “That fine gentleman back there is my father, Carmen. He taught me respect – respect your elders, respect your Veterans. You go to any function in this town and you see senior citizens or Veterans, who’s there? Me, and my 85-year-old father. It’s about respect. They were left out of the loop. I understand it’s for Joe. Great guy. If you didn’t know Joe, you lost out on a very special person. But the whole thing is, and it’s as simple as this: It is a fundraiser.” He closed his comments by recognizing that none of the things we enjoy would be possible without the Veterans.
 
Commissioner O’Brien made a motion to allow the rabbit to stay until September, at which time, he said, it should be relocated to a spot chosen by Dedham Public Art Project. He added, “I’d like to also move further that any further requests for licenses at the Oakdale Park, that the Veterans Agent be contacted so that he might contact the Combined Veterans Council and each commander, and report back to your board.”
 
After O’Brien had finished speaking Bob Chaffee, a District 6 Town Meeting member, member of both the VFW Post 2017 and American Legion Post 18, as well as a Vietnam Veteran, made a point of order. “The only thing I’m going to say to you is when I sat where you sit, as a member of the Board of Selectmen, I never shot anybody down. A lot of people came here tonight,” he said. “They should be allowed to speak.”
 
Hart then wrapped up that portion of the meeting. “At this point we are going to move forward on the other agenda items,” he said. “We will take under advisement the request that was made and we will also be addressing, long term, the appropriate use of all parkland and permitting processes.”

Written by shiretown99

June 21, 2012 at 11:45 pm

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Editorial cartoon: Rabbit at library

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Written by shiretown99

June 21, 2012 at 5:16 am

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English proverb

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“Make hay while the sun shines.”

Written by shiretown99

June 21, 2012 at 5:14 am

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Editorial cartoon: Veterans Park at Oakdale Common

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Written by shiretown99

June 16, 2012 at 6:52 am

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