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Archive for April 2013

Lynch election night gathering set for Moseley’s

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poll workers

[Note: The following details were posted on the respective campaign websites and/or provided to The Dedham Times by the campaigns of the candidates for U.S. Senate in the special election on Tuesday, April 30.  All events start at or around 8 p.m., when polls close across the state]

Democratic

Congressman Stephen Lynch: Moseley’s-on-the-Charles, 50 Bridge St., Dedham.

Congressman Edward Markey: Omni Parker House, 60 School Street, Boston.

 

Republican

Investor Gabriel Gomez: Red Line Inn, 71 South Main Street, Cohasset.

Former US Attorney Michael Sullivan: Emerald Hall, Morgan Ave. , Abington.

State Rep Daniel Winslow: Campaign Headquarters, 167 Milk Street, Boston.

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Written by shiretown99

April 29, 2013 at 7:42 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Community Theatre hosts ‘Take Me Out to the Ballgame’ exhibit

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On Thursday evening, April 25, Dedham Community Theatre (DCT) hosted the opening reception of a baseball-themed art exhibit titled ‘Take Me Out to the Ballgame.’ Guests browsed two dozen works adorning the theatre’s lower level, which formerly housed the Museum of Bad Art. The ‘Baseball Challenge,’ marking the arrival of spring and celebrating America’s pastime, is sponsored by Dedham Youth Baseball and represents the first foray of Dedham Square Artist Guild from its space across High Street to DCT. The exhibit will run through May 18. 
 
Shown here are Kerry Hawkins, a co-founder of Dedham Square Artist Guild and Sue Hoy, a Dedham resident who is displaying an oil painting at the show. At far left is a diorama of Fenway Park by Dedham resident Maddie Friday, who plays on the Braves in the Minor League of Dedham Youth Baseball. At far right is a 16″ x 20″ photo on linen titled ‘Fenway Fantoms’ by guild member Melanie Guerra of Westwood, priced at $120.

Written by shiretown99

April 27, 2013 at 3:25 am

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Munchbach propels DHS girls lax with hat trick

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The Marauders hosted Framingham on Tuesday afternoon in less-than-ideal conditions at Veterans Field at Stone Park, and the Flyers prevailed 16-6 despite a hat trick by tri-captain Jodie Munchbach. Also for the hosts Geneva Driscoll scored twice and tri-captain Hayley Driscoll tallied once. 

Head Coach Jessie Koffman discussed the result afterward. “Playing outside in the cold and the wet weather doesn’t, I don’t think, bring out the best in any team. It was a bit sloppy on our end compared to our past game in Weymouth that we played which I thought was absolutely amazing. We did some good things. I think we worked very well on our ride, on pressuring their goalie when they were trying to clear the ball. Offensively we still need to work on getting better angles and taking better shots and not forcing it. But overall the hustle and all that stuff was there from the girls. So I think they played a decent game.”

With several victories already and a full month remaining in the regular season, DHS remains in the playoff hunt. Coach Koffman said, “We’re in D (Division) 3. The only other D-3 team (on our schedule) is Milton. We play them twice, and if we beat them once then we get to go to the state tournament, which would be a first which would be amazing for the program.” The first game against the Wildcats was originally set for April 19, and has not yet been rescheduled. The Marauders’ upcoming three games are on the road: at Walpole on Thursday, North Quincy next Monday and Braintree next Tuesday, all with 3:45 p.m. starts. Dedham’s next home game is slated for Wednesday, May 1 versus Quincy at 7 p.m.

 

Written by shiretown99

April 24, 2013 at 1:43 am

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Group holds candlelight ceremony in honor of marathon bombing victims

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On the evening of Friday, April 19, a small group of Church of the Good Shepherd members and other local residents gathered at Oakdale Common for a candlelight vigil to reflect on the tragedy at the Boston Marathon and in its aftermath. Organized by parishioner Patty Roberts and led by Rev. Noble Scheepers of the host church and Rev. Cheryl Kerr of Allin Congregational Church, the service featured songs and prayers in honor of those most affected. Rev. Scheepers serves on the Board of Directors of the Boston City Singers, a group with at least one young member who was severely injured by one of the bombs on Patriots Day.

Rev. Scheepers began the service as follows. “Thank all of you for coming out here and sharing with us this very important and touching and impactful commemoration of what we have endured and experienced this past week.” He led several prayers, and reflected on the resilience shown by the community at large. “I have to say to you this evening, as a very new person in this country, relatively new being here four and a half years, coming from South Africa that has experienced so much pain with its past persecutions, the kind of camaraderie, support and love, not just for the victims of this tragedy, but for the city, is something to behold.”

Rev. Kerr led call-and-response liturgy, and also read a selection from the Book of Exodus. The town’s poet laureate, Christopher Reilley, read a poem. The group joined together in songs such as ‘Peace, Perfect Peace,’ ‘O Soul, Are You Weary’ and ‘America the Beautiful.’

Written by shiretown99

April 23, 2013 at 5:15 am

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Dozens hear lecture on naval history in Civil War

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On the evening of Thursday, April 18 several dozen people attended the Ben Fisher Memorial Lecture at Dedham Historical Society (DHS), given by Professor William Fowler, Distinguished Professor of History at Northeastern University. His PowerPoint presentation, based on his book on the same topic, was titled “Under Two Flags: The Navy in the Civil War.” Before he was formally introduced to the audience, Board of Directors Member Andrea Gilmore announced nominations of the following officers for the upcoming year: William Flanagan – Treasurer, Mark Whalen – Recording Secretary, and Maryanne Osborne, Laurie Rabe and Stanton Lyman – Members of the Board of Directors. That slate passed unanimously on a voice vote of the DHS members present. 

After noting that the occasion marked the 154th anniversary of the founding of the Society, President Stephen Brayton introduced Dr. Fowler by highlighting notable positions he has held, including Distinguished Fellow in American History at Mount Vernon, Lecturer at the Smithsonian Institution and Instructor at the Mystic Seaport Museum. 

Professor Fowler gave a detailed overview of the naval strategy of the war, emphasizing the Union’s dominant position in manpower and material, combined with the boldness of its leaders such as General Ulysses Grant and Admiral David Porter who combined their forces to capture Vicksburg on the Mississippi River. Dr. Fowler explained General Winfield Scott’s so-called Anaconda Plan to blockade and divide the South, the epic battle between the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia (formerly the USS Merrimack), the failed assault by the Massachusetts 54th Regiment on Battery Wagner, the ability of the Rebel raider CSS Alabama to wreak havoc on over sixty American commercial ships around the globe before the USS Kearsarge sank it, and the famous command of Union Admiral David Farragut in the storming of Mobile Bay: ‘Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!’

After the lecture, which lasted about one hour, audience members took part in a question-and-answer session with the speaker. Following the program guests enjoyed light refreshments such as apple cider and oatmeal raisin treats provided by attendee Carol Sestito, also known as ‘The Cookie Lady.’  

Shown here from left: Dedham Historical Society President Stephen Brayton, Northeastern University Professor of History William Fowler, Dedham Historical Society Executive Director Vicky Kruckeberg.

 

Written by shiretown99

April 19, 2013 at 2:48 am

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Locals reflect on tragedy and chaos at Boston Marathon finish line; security to be tightened at Ramble

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mile 4

   
The explosions at the finish line of this year’s Boston Marathon, which killed three spectators and took limbs from dozens more, attracted the prayers of the nation this past week. President Obama visited the city yesterday for a memorial ceremony, after authorities locked down several square miles of the Back Bay on Monday after the blasts. The Dedham Times spoke with several local people involved closely with the running community for their perspectives on that day and how it will affect the future.
 
Anne Francis has run Boston twice previously, in 2009 and 2011. This year she decided to volunteer at the mile 4 water hand-off in Ashland, along with about 80 other members of the Dedham-based club Thirsty Irish Runners (TIR). She ran the Chicago Marathon last year swiftly enough to qualify for Boston either this year or next, and she said the events of Monday afternoon on Boylston make her more resolved to run the Hopkinton-to-Boston course next spring. She spoke with The Dedham Times by phone Wednesday night. Here are major excerpts of that conversation:
 
“Donna Tolley and I drove into Boston (after helping to break down the Ashland rest stop) because Daniela Bitto (who was running the marathon) is our trainer… I actually saw her at mile 4. There were four or Five Thirsy Irish Runners running. Dick Doran broke his neck earlier, and almost got to finish this year… We watned tosee people further along… we left Ashland a little after 1, then drove into town. I knew places to park (from having once lived in the city). We parked in the South End and ran down Mass. Ave. There’s a tunnel that goes under Mass. Ave, and you come out on Comm. Ave. We had a good spot to see runners coming in. We saw ‘D’ (Daniela’s nickname), she finished around 2:35. We were tracking people on our phones… Then we heard the booms. They seemed kind of far off.
stop 

“You definitely knew it was something weird… We commented, ‘What was that?’. There were some policemen that started moving toward the finish line. You could see them listening to their ear pieces. That’s when they took the barrier in front of us and moved it to stop all the runners. The booms were very close together. The police reacted very quickly. You knew the booms were the problem, whatever they might have been. We milled around maybe for five minutes, then the police said, ‘We’re clearing the area.’ ‘D’ had already texted me that she was done, so I knew she was OK. Other freinds were out on the course, we were trying to get in touch with people. I wanted them (other members of TIR) to know I had seen the two runners (TIR members Niko and Regina, both of Milton) I had already seen and to try to get in touch with other runners.
 
“Then the cell phones started crashing. You could see runners coming up that were done (from the closest subway stop). People were asking questions. We decided the last thing anybody needed was two more people standing around (so we drove back to Dedham). As we got further out from the city, we started getting texts coming through. We were trying to answer people’s questions about who we had seen or not seen… We must have gotten to Comm. Ave about 1:45… We were there for an hour at least.
 
“This makes me more determined (to run). Now we’re mad. Nobody should be allowed to do this to this event.  I went to Norwood tonight, to Charles River Running Store – a group of us went running. We had a moment of silence. Running is a very community – oriented thing. We support each other, we see people at races. You say ‘Hi, how are you?’ This is bringing us together and making our bond stronger. Jimmy English ran it for the 31st time, and I know people who ran it for the first time.
 
“Everybody is forever changed because of what happened. There’s no way they’re not going to be. It’s the most prestigious marathon there is. Last year people could defer to this year because of the heat that was so unbearable, and I think there were 4,000 people who did it. I’m going to run it (next year) for all the people who’ve ever watched it , and for all the people who lost their lives and their limbs, because I’m a runner and that’s what I can do. I had people I hadn’t talked to in three years text me (to verify she was OK).”
 
John McGourty of Dedham is the coordinator of Thirsty Irish Runners. He described an orderly morning, followed by mayhem. “Angelo’s from Tutto’s Italiano cooked breakfast for the crew. Bob Stanley is a DJ, he played all the music. We’re in Ashland just after the clock factory. This was about my sixth or seventh year doing it. We were done at 12 or 12:30 cleaning up. A handful of our group went in (to Boston). We usually go to the Chicken Bone Saloon in Framingham.
 
“We had about 10 people from the club running. One of the guys was just turning onto Hereford Street when the explosions went off. We were frantically making calls, we were trying to get a hold of everyone. My phone was ringing off the hook between people calling in to see how everyone from our club was doing.
 
“We had a few people stop at mile 21. I’m thinking of contacting the BAA (Boston Athletic Association), and maybe have the club be there at the (rescheduled) finish. Jimmy (English) was a couple hundred yards away from the finish… We’re thinking of just doing it on our own (a finish). Jimmy would have been right around 4 hours. Dan and Linda Fitzpatrick, Judy Conroy, Dick Doran of Bonham Road and his wife Mary Ellen – they were right across from it when it all happened. One guy, Jack O’Connor from Dedham, was checking checkpoints. Jimmy we were really worried about. It’s usually a joyous spot. To have that happen…
 
“I’ve been running in the area for 30-something years. I’ve done different series, I know a lot of people. It was a hit on the running community. Boston’s a world-class event. I’m almost thinking I’m going to do it next year, just to prove they can’t stop us. I did the Marine Corps Marathon right after 9/11, and they had SWAT teams up on the roofs and a checkpoint just to start the race. That’s almost what they’re going to have to do now.
 
“I think of Boston and the history. You’ve got the Duel in the Sun, you’ve got the Run for the Hoses. It hit close to home in more ways than one.”
 
Martin Hanley, Founder and Executive Director of the James Joyce Ramble, had a similarly focused reaction. He said, “Every open-to-the public civic event in America is looking at this, not just us. We are reaching out to the state and consultants to see what resources may be available to us. In the meantime , we are revising our security and emergency protocols to adjust. No unattended bags will be tolerated anywhere on the estate or near East St.. Access to the post race party will be limited to runners and guest who have wristbands. We are meeting with the Chief of Police.
 
“We will ask runners and the public to be particularly observant of anything out of the ordinary.  That according to security experts is the most effective way to prevent another horrific tragedy such as Monday’s. An open society cannot change its values and have its citizens live in fear. To do so is a victory for these evil cowards.
 
“I am trying to find an appropriate way to honor the victims of this terrible attack at our race.”

Written by shiretown99

April 18, 2013 at 9:05 pm

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Editorial cartoon: Every day is Earth Day

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Written by shiretown99

April 18, 2013 at 1:16 pm

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